The 5 Website Metrics Small Business Owners Must Understand

The 5 Website Metrics Small Business Owners Must Understand

A website is imperative to the success of any small business – but understanding the effectiveness of that site is the key to transforming consumer insights into actual sales.

So what metrics are the most important when it comes to how people are interacting with and using your small business site? Take a look at the top five website analytics you must understand to run a successful small business:

Page views. The most basic of all website metrics, you must know your baseline page views so you can tell if your site traffic is increasing over time – and by how much. Page views include all the “clicks” on your page, whether a visitor just goes to one page or multiple ones.

Unique visitors. This number is smaller than basic page views because it represents the individual visitors to your website. Someone who reads 20 product descriptions on separate pages only represents one unique visitor. The bigger the difference between unique and overall page views, the better. It means that the people who are coming to your page are sticking around.

Devices. How did your visitors arrive at your site? Increasingly, mobile is becoming the first internet source that people tap, completely cutting out the PC experience. This isn’t to say that you should completely neglect PC-friendly features but you should know how people are finding you. Ideally, your regular website should be optimized for mobile and users coming from all types of devices should be able to access what they need with ease.

Time spent. All the search engine optimization in the world won’t keep customers on your site for very long if they can’t find what they want easily. Are you doing enough to keep people on your site after that initial click? You certainly don’t want to hinder the buying process but you don’t want people clicking back to the search engine results mere seconds after finding you. If your website metrics are telling you that you have a high bounce rate, or percentage of viewers who leave your site after only seeing one page, then it might be time to consider more intriguing ways to keep people interested in your business and what it has to offer.

Conversions. From a bottom line perspective, this is the absolute most important metric to understand about a small business website. A good-looking site that ranks well in a search engine doesn’t mean a whole lot if it can’t take it one step further: converting visitors to customers. For some sites, a conversion occurs when a visitor actually buys something, and for others it happens when a contact form is filled out or a phone number is dialed. Whatever your desired outcome, knowing how many of your visitors are taking your cyber bait is important to fresh, innovative site updates. Most experts agree that on an ecommerce site, a 2.5 percent conversion rate is good.

 

Your small business website is your window to an entire world of customers – take advantage of that fact and let your analytics lead your website sales strategy.

 

Twitter Google Search – What it Means for You

Twitter Google Search

Early last month a deal was made to bring back Twitter Google search. Google will now have access to the Twitter “firehose” which will result in more tweets being found in Google search.

These two had an agreement between 2009 and 2011 where Google had similar access.

Twitter Google Search

If you’re an individual or business and benefit from being searched it’s time to start tweeting. This gives you another route to be found. With this deal your tweets can show in up Google search in real-time. That’s big.

While Google already crawls Twitter, having access to the Twitter “firehose” makes it easier for Google to get tweets seen in their search. A lot more tweets. Of course, this means that non-twitter users will see tweets in Google search. This is really good for Twitter, good for Google, and good for your business if you’re tweeting.

Twitter has a similar deal with Bing and Yahoo already.

What you should do so your tweets show up in Google search

If you’re not already on Twitter and tweeting consistently it’s something you should seriously consider adding to your marketing arsenal. If you’re a business you want to be found in search. Well this gives you another route to be found. If you’re not tweeting you will be missing a strong opportunity to be discovered, something at least one of your competitors will likely be doing.

The chances of your tweets showing up in Google search will dramatically increase if you’re active and consistent. This has been a challenge for many individuals and businesses. Tweeting should be like brushing your teeth if you want to show up in search. Do it daily, or have someone do it for you daily.

5 Quick Twitter Tips:

1) Be Consistent – Post 6-8 tweets daily at minimum, every day, throughout the day and evening
2) Include valuable content in your tweets consistently
3) Use Images – visual works
4) Use Video – Twitter native video was recently unveiled
5) Use some level of care when tweeting – Your tweet could end up in Google search

This is expected to start in the coming months, so get tweeting today. You don’t want to miss this opportunity.

How to Build Meaningful Connections on LinkedIn

 

Using LinkedIn to build professional connections can be a powerful tool in your business arsenal. LinkedIn boasts millions of members, and your profile on the site has a huge array of ways to showcase your professional talents and accomplishments. I’ve talked before about how to put together a great profile that will help you get found by other people who might be good connections. But who exactly should you be connecting with?

Like I said above, LinkedIn has millions of users. So should you accept connection requests from everyone who sends them? Probably not. While LinkedIn is a professional website, it is not free from spammers and people who are not looking to make actual connections. LinkedIn is a good place to be selective when it comes to saying yes to connection requests.

In order to attract the right kind of connections, here are a few things you can do to your profile:

  • Figure out a strategy as to how you want yourself to be seen on LinkedIn. Do you want to paint yourself as an expert in a particular field or niche? If so, make sure that you use the right keywords when it comes to your summary and work descriptions.
  • Think about your target audience. Are you looking to join professional groups or have them notice you? Tailor your content as such.
  • Think about how much time you have to spend making connections on LinkedIn. Once you have a time frame in mind, you can come up with a game plan.

So how do you decide who to let into your LinkedIn network? Here are a few tips:

  • I generally say yes to anyone that I know. You can take this strategy, or you can be selective in who you add. Just be prepared for questions or reminders from colleagues or acquaintances who you have chosen not to add to your network.
  • If the request is coming from someone who you don’t know, take a minute to look over their profile. Do you have something in common? Maybe you went to the same college, had the same major, or worked for the same company in the past. Maybe you have a mutual friend or professional connection. Vet the person who is asking before saying yes or no.
  • Don’t feel bad about saying no. It’s fine to keep your professional network relatively closed. If you don’t see any value in adding the person who has requested to join your network, then don’t!

When building out your connections on LinkedIn, remember that you are in control. Follow these tips above and you’ll be on your way to building meaningful connections.

(Photo Source)

Megan Totka is the Chief Editor for ChamberofCommerce.com. She specializes on the topic of small business tips and resources. ChamberofCommerce.com helps small businesses grow their business on the web and facilitates connectivity between local businesses and more than 7,000 Chambers of Commerce worldwide.