Cutting Through the Noise to Build Customer Trust

 

This is surprising: Only 38% of people say that they can trust most people. 57% say they cannot, according to the General Social Survey (GSS.)

Trust is a funny thing. It’s hard to earn and easy to lose.Cutting Through the Noise to Build Customer Trust

As a business, trust is essential to sales. Recent statistics show content is the key to building that trust:

● Watching product videos makes 52% of consumers more likely to buy, according to Octoly.
● 59% of consumers place equal weight on personal recommendations and online reviews, according to Balihoo.
● 77% of consumers are more likely to purchase a product after learning about it from a friend or family member, according to Nielsen.

The goal of breaking through the noise is to get people to recommend your business. One of the best and easiest ways to do that is through content marketing.

Here are four content marketing tips to show how your business can better connect to customers in a crowded market.

1. Focus on Producing Higher Quality Content

The first step toward giving your customer a better impression of your brand is improving the quality of your content.

You may already post blogs to your website, videos and images on social media networks, and frequently upload other forms of content to your website. The variety of content you create is great, but are you adding value? Or are you just adding noise?

High quality content outshines the competition and improves your consumers’ lives, building trust in the process. When you’re creating your next blog post, webinar, or podcast, ask yourself the following:

● How will my audience benefit from this information?
● Is this something my audience needs to hear?
● Does this content answer a question my audience is asking?

If your content passes the sniff test for quality, hit publish. If not, revise until it’s ready to shine.

2. Ask for the Share

Once your content is live, invite your readers to share it. If your readers share it, chances are others in their networks will notice.

Shares are personal recommendations from one person to others. People are more willing to trust your brand when they get an endorsement from someone in their network.

3. Watch the Numbers Behind the Content

Too often, content producers hit publish and then walk away feeling accomplished. In reality, it’s just the beginning of the marketing process.

For your content marketing to succeed, you need to know what works, what resonates, and what falls short. Watching the numbers behind your work will tell a more accurate story about what your audience wants.

Here are some of the more critical analytics to monitor:

● Traffic. How many people landed on the webpage?
● Referral Sources. How did people find your content?
● Time. How long did people spend with your content?
● Shares. Did your readers love it enough to share it?

By watching how your audience engages with what you produce, you’ll get a better sense of what’s wanted and what’s getting lost in the shuffle.

4. Use Multiple Forms of Media

Some people love to read blog posts. Others want to watch webinars or listen to podcasts. Mixing up the media in which you deliver your content can help you reach a wider audience without diluting your message.

Try mixing video, audio, compelling visuals, and text. You can use combinations of these media forms too. For example, add a video to a blog post and include a small description and transcript below it.

The more methods you have for people to interact with your content, the more likely you are to be heard.

Building trust starts with getting heard. If you want to grow your customer base and establish your business as one to trust in the market, high quality content is critical. Watch what the market wants from your company and then deliver in a variety of media forms.

Kimberly Crossland is a content marketing expert focused on helping small businesses break through the noise and boost their position online. Sign up for her email list to get weekly .

Too soon? The Ethics and Etiquette of Copyright

 

Copyright has always been a sticking point for everybody. From the days of Shakespeare right up to the modern world of mass-distributed digital and online multimedia, issues of ownership and sharing have dogged the creative arts and led to friction and intrigue. Naturally this has all only got more complicated with the advent of internet, social media and the mass-production and distribution of multimedia. But are we actually any further on?

The Ethics and Etiquette of Copyright

One big question the multimedia industries are having to consider anew is the extent to which they can, and should, police information sharing for infringements of copyright. The opening up of the internet to millions of private users has made it simply impossible to prevent the reproduction of media on a mass scale. Consequently this activity, at least on a modest scale, tends to raise eyebrows but is generally ignored. After all, it is hardly reasonable to think that millions upon millions of users could be simultaneously arrested and/or have court cases brought against them.

The question becomes rather more serious when private users start to reproduce and distribute media on a mass scale. This presents a financial risk to the copyright holders and, if not kept under some sort of control, has the potential to seriously undermine the industry. While Hollywood musicians and filmmakers can hardly complain about the odd DVD copy when their films have enjoyed success and brought in solid revenues, the small-scale studios who rarely cover costs simply cannot afford to lose revenue.

The quandary of what an acceptable level of copyright infringement should be really gets to the heart of the issue. This is because, far from being a legal issue, in pragmatic terms copyright really is as much about ethics and etiquette as it is about rules. The industries may be unable to force people not to copy DVD or CD media, but they could yet manage to persuade them. Unfortunately the culture of the industry is in disarray, with one set of standards for consumers, another for the industry and often hard feelings between the two groups. This, even if it were sustainable (which it isn’t) would be an inadequate state of affairs.

A different way to approach the issue might be to consider the question of timescale. Antiquated works of literature and art eventually lose their copyright and become ‘public’. For almost all of the Western World, the lifetime of a copyright before a work enters the public domain is seventy years after the death of the author; to copy DVD and CD media, the United Kingdom has a lifespan of fifty years while the United States sets it at ninety-five years. But considering the vast profits that are made by the work of, for example, The Beatles, is this soon enough?

In one sense these questions of copyright ethics are likely to simply idle on unresolved. In another sense, though, a resolution will necessarily be found through some international body or agreement – and ultimately, this will need to be based on the equilibrium between what producers and consumers will accept. A middle ground will sooner or later be found. The alternative is a continuous discord between the producers and consumers of media and that, whichever way one looks at it, is in no one’s best interest.

Martin Johnson is director of the UK’s leading DVD/Blu-ray/CD duplication company providing exceptional quality at the lowest UK prices. He offers next day delivery anywhere in the UK and will complete your job quickly with the greatest care. You can connect with him on Google+.