How to Choose the Best TV Provider

Television

For most people, TV is their primary source of entertainment. Therefore, they want to be sure that they are dealing with a TV provider that will provide them with a great deal of value for the money they are spending on their service. Unfortunately, this is not as easy to find as you might think. There are a large amount of TV providers out there. All of them claim to give their customers the best service. In many cases, this is simply not true. You will need to take some time to thoroughly look into any TV provider you are thinking about doing business with. Here is how you can go about choosing the best TV provider.

1. What channels are in the basic package?

This is the question that you need to ask before anything else. The basic package is what all customers must subscribe to when they are doing business with a TV provider. In many cases, the basic package will be filled with channels you will never watch. Therefore, you must look around for a basic package that provides you with value by having a minimal amount of channels you do not care about.

2. What premium channels are available?

Many people would agree that the best shows are on the premium channels. These are the channels you will need to pay extra for in addition to the fee you are paying for the basic package. Many TV providers will have different tiers you can choose from. Each tier contains a predetermined number of premium channels. Other providers allow you to choose the specific premium channels that you want. Finding the best deal for you will depend on which specific premium channels that you plan on watching the most. One of best TV providers out there is called ACN Inc. Info about them can be found by going to .

3. What are their introductory offers?

TV providers will often have special introductory offers that they use to entice new customers to sign up. You should shop around and compare the offers that are available in your area. Some offers may require you to sign a contract. If this is the case, you will need it decide if you are willing to make a long-term commitment to this provider. The savings you receive may make signing the contract a good decision. You should also find out what the early termination fee is.

Beyond Digital Video: 4 Other Ways to Visually Connect with Customers

Visually Connect with Customers

2015 has been called the year of the video, and that moniker makes sense. More than 4 billion videos are uploaded and clicked on Facebook alone every day and that’s only one video-friendly site.

Consider the billions of collective hits sites like YouTube and Vimeo, and even Twitter’s new video platform, garner on a daily basis. These sites are just meeting the consumer demand for digital video content that has skyrocketed in the past few years.

Video content is just one piece of a larger digital strategy though. If you want the best marketing tools to grow your business, you need to think beyond a one-dimensional strategy.

There are other ways to incorporate visuals into your online content and by adding some variety, you will appeal to a larger audience. Take a look at four digital visual tools you should be incorporating, alongside video offerings.

  • These easily digestible pieces of content display information in a fun format that combines images and text. Infographs are surprisingly popular too – 62 million Google searches were done on the term in April 2015. It is also 30 times more likely that an infograph will be read over text formats alone. Not sure how to create an infographic? Head to Slideshare, Piktochart or Visual.ly.
  • These online visuals are designed to be shared and you don’t have to be funny or snarky for it to work. If creating a Grumpy Cat meme isn’t exactly in line with your company branding, look for a basic backdrop and a quote that will resonate with your audience. The key is to find a thought that will have mass appeal so that your followers and fans feel encouraged to share it with their circles.
  • These “Graphics Interchange Format” visuals are a good combination between flat infographics and longer videos. GIFs are engaging, but don’t require a large time commitment. If you are planning a list-style blog post, incorporating GIFs alongside your points will help drive your message home and keep your readers interacting with your content.
  • Photo galleries. Keep people engaged with a topic for longer than one page view with a photo gallery. If you are writing a how-to article, consider making it a photo gallery of the different steps. Photo galleries also work well for travel pieces and recipes. Have your website visitors choose to click on your site again and again with an engaging and intriguing photo gallery.

It’s important to capture the attention of people online as emerging technology advances and visuals will help you accomplish that.

Small businesses that harness the power of easily accessible technology will see their marketing campaigns succeed. Video content is thriving but offering your audience some visual alternatives is another way to ensure that they stay interested in you and ultimately what you are selling.

Do you have a multi-faceted visual marketing strategy?

Too soon? The Ethics and Etiquette of Copyright

 

Copyright has always been a sticking point for everybody. From the days of Shakespeare right up to the modern world of mass-distributed digital and online multimedia, issues of ownership and sharing have dogged the creative arts and led to friction and intrigue. Naturally this has all only got more complicated with the advent of internet, social media and the mass-production and distribution of multimedia. But are we actually any further on?

The Ethics and Etiquette of Copyright

One big question the multimedia industries are having to consider anew is the extent to which they can, and should, police information sharing for infringements of copyright. The opening up of the internet to millions of private users has made it simply impossible to prevent the reproduction of media on a mass scale. Consequently this activity, at least on a modest scale, tends to raise eyebrows but is generally ignored. After all, it is hardly reasonable to think that millions upon millions of users could be simultaneously arrested and/or have court cases brought against them.

The question becomes rather more serious when private users start to reproduce and distribute media on a mass scale. This presents a financial risk to the copyright holders and, if not kept under some sort of control, has the potential to seriously undermine the industry. While Hollywood musicians and filmmakers can hardly complain about the odd DVD copy when their films have enjoyed success and brought in solid revenues, the small-scale studios who rarely cover costs simply cannot afford to lose revenue.

The quandary of what an acceptable level of copyright infringement should be really gets to the heart of the issue. This is because, far from being a legal issue, in pragmatic terms copyright really is as much about ethics and etiquette as it is about rules. The industries may be unable to force people not to copy DVD or CD media, but they could yet manage to persuade them. Unfortunately the culture of the industry is in disarray, with one set of standards for consumers, another for the industry and often hard feelings between the two groups. This, even if it were sustainable (which it isn’t) would be an inadequate state of affairs.

A different way to approach the issue might be to consider the question of timescale. Antiquated works of literature and art eventually lose their copyright and become ‘public’. For almost all of the Western World, the lifetime of a copyright before a work enters the public domain is seventy years after the death of the author; to copy DVD and CD media, the United Kingdom has a lifespan of fifty years while the United States sets it at ninety-five years. But considering the vast profits that are made by the work of, for example, The Beatles, is this soon enough?

In one sense these questions of copyright ethics are likely to simply idle on unresolved. In another sense, though, a resolution will necessarily be found through some international body or agreement – and ultimately, this will need to be based on the equilibrium between what producers and consumers will accept. A middle ground will sooner or later be found. The alternative is a continuous discord between the producers and consumers of media and that, whichever way one looks at it, is in no one’s best interest.

Martin Johnson is director of the UK’s leading DVD/Blu-ray/CD duplication company providing exceptional quality at the lowest UK prices. He offers next day delivery anywhere in the UK and will complete your job quickly with the greatest care. You can connect with him on Google+.